Part 2: The nuts & bolts of proficiency-based grading

By Cristin Bleess
@CristinBleess
Instructional Strategist

Grades should be effective communication vehicles, and the methods used to determine them need to provide optimum opportunities for student success and to encourage learning.—Ken O’Connor, How to Grade for Learning 

Over the course of a few years, my colleagues and I came up with a proficiency-based grading system that we felt truly reflected how our students were able to use the target language. I want to share a few topics you need to consider when making the shift to a more proficiency-based grade book. You may not be at a place to implement all of these ideas right now (if you are, that’s awesome!) and that’s OK; you can start by changing one or two things now as you are transitioning. 

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Part 1: Getting started with proficiency-based grading

By Cristin Bleess
@cristinbleess
Instructional Strategist

I have always focused on getting my students to use the language in the classes I have taught, even before anyone was talking about the “path to proficiency”. But I never really thought much about my grade book and if it reflected what was important in my classroom: how the students use the language. I now realize that for more than half of my teaching career my grade book was not focused on what I was saying important. It was focused on tests, projects, quizzes, homework, and participation, not communication. 

Continue reading “Part 1: Getting started with proficiency-based grading”

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